Testing Gone Wrong

In his post Six Things That Go Wrong With Discussions About Testing, James Bach lists six different things that can often go wrong when testers are discussing testings. His six reasons can be summarized as testers misunderstanding the purposes of testing and not following the proper procedure when it comes to testing.

Your goal when testing is to discover any vulnerabilities in your program, but also to find strengths and things your program is doing well. This covers James’ first two points. When it comes to testing, quality is much more important than quantity. It is better to have a more complete coverage of your program and all its branches than to have a bunch of tests doing the same thing and missing different parts of your program. This is why it is important to think of tests as events instead. What is important is what your test is testing and how it goes about that, and it shouldn’t be thought of as some ‘Generic X Test.’

Often times people get carried away with automated testing and rely too much on it. While it is good to use automated testing, developers have strength far beyond that, and should use automated tests as tools to better accomplish effective testing, not as automated workers that do your work for you. Thinking of automated tests in this way also distracts from the purpose of testing, and makes it easier to forget why you should run certain tests in the first place.

James’ last point is probably his most important one. Testing isn’t just some set task that can be navigated a certain way every time. What I’ve learned this year is that testing is about thinking critically about a program and the way it COULD act, and design your tests according to those parameters. Consider where things can go wrong, and try to test the strength of weak parts of your code. But most importantly, be ready to learn, as every program has a different set of tests with a different strategy that is most effective for testing. Testing is a dynamic thing, and testers must be dynamic people.

Back to Front

In his post Back-end Development vs Front-end Development, Mikke Goes explains the differences between back-end and front-end development. He also goes into detail about the places where they intersect. Mikke also speaks briefly on combining both areas of development into what is known as full-stack development.

Back-end development concerns itself with the storage and manipulation of data. For example, when you log into your email, your browsers sends a request to the server to return all the information concerning your account, such as your settings and inbox. The mechanisms behind the storage and transferring of this information is the back-end. Back-end development concerns itself with the parts of a program you don’t usually see, but does a lot of work behind the scenes.

Front-end development finds its responsibilities mostly in the visual aspects of your program or application. All the buttons, text, and input fields on a web page are designed by front-end developers. This gives the users ways to interact with all the information stored in the back-end, creating an interface that bridges the gap between the client and the server. Both the functionality and appearance of web pages can fall under the duties of a front-end developer.

Full-stack development puts it all together. This is an understandably powerful position to operate in, as working on both the front- and back-end together ensures that they will be designed with each-other in mind and written properly and effectively. In CS-343 this semester, we have to work on a project where we are effectively full-stack developers. It is challenging to have to work on both at the same time, but I think working on one helps your understanding of what needs to go on the other end to tie everything together.

Front-end and back-end development are both important concepts. A web application isn’t going to exist without one or the other, and both are ultimately just as important to the end result as each-other. The differences are apparent, which is why it makes sense some people make a living doing one or the other. Ultimately, Mikee makes a good point that understanding both types is a boon to learning how to develop web applications.