Back to Front

In his post Back-end Development vs Front-end Development, Mikke Goes explains the differences between back-end and front-end development. He also goes into detail about the places where they intersect. Mikke also speaks briefly on combining both areas of development into what is known as full-stack development.

Back-end development concerns itself with the storage and manipulation of data. For example, when you log into your email, your browsers sends a request to the server to return all the information concerning your account, such as your settings and inbox. The mechanisms behind the storage and transferring of this information is the back-end. Back-end development concerns itself with the parts of a program you don’t usually see, but does a lot of work behind the scenes.

Front-end development finds its responsibilities mostly in the visual aspects of your program or application. All the buttons, text, and input fields on a web page are designed by front-end developers. This gives the users ways to interact with all the information stored in the back-end, creating an interface that bridges the gap between the client and the server. Both the functionality and appearance of web pages can fall under the duties of a front-end developer.

Full-stack development puts it all together. This is an understandably powerful position to operate in, as working on both the front- and back-end together ensures that they will be designed with each-other in mind and written properly and effectively. In CS-343 this semester, we have to work on a project where we are effectively full-stack developers. It is challenging to have to work on both at the same time, but I think working on one helps your understanding of what needs to go on the other end to tie everything together.

Front-end and back-end development are both important concepts. A web application isn’t going to exist without one or the other, and both are ultimately just as important to the end result as each-other. The differences are apparent, which is why it makes sense some people make a living doing one or the other. Ultimately, Mikee makes a good point that understanding both types is a boon to learning how to develop web applications.

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